Studio

What We Do:

‘Cultivate A Shared Ambition’

There is no single blueprint to creating a successful project.

We cultivate a ‘shared ambition’ together with our clients in 
an open, holistic and cost-conscious manner to uncover the core of each project and produce imaginative, challenging 
and considered architecture.

Whether we are working with urban planning, an individual building, interior space or a single piece of furniture our 
‘shared ambition’ is the touchstone that we always refer to
in developing the design.

How We Work:

‘Embrace Collaboration & Research’

We take a hands-on, collaborative and analytical approach to each project, assessing its needs by exploring the brief, context and site with all parties involved to produce the best results.

We work together with our clients and the right experts to maximise a project’s potential and shape its development, integrating their advice & expertise from the outset.

We use this close collaboration to ensure our clients specific needs are well met but also to benefit the broader context of the project by incorporating the interests of social groups, public space and the environment within the process.

Who We Are:

‘An Experienced Collective’

We are a small, highly skilled multi-national team with a
wealth of experience and an exemplary pedigree of work.

We combine an innate Swiss precision with a broader international outlook to create unique and robust architectural solutions that blend these contrasting perspectives.

We draw upon our worldwide network of expert collaborators, advisers and specialists to amplify the knowledge base of our in-house teams and provide clients with direct access to
first-class academic and research institutions.

What You Get:

‘No House Style’

We do not prescribe any architectural form or impose any singular style or identity to our work.

We create bespoke projects, tailor-made to their own clients, users, requirements, place and environment.

Our approach ensures the development of a richer and more specific architecture that incorporates successful social, economic and environmentally sustainable solutions.

Team

since 2010

José Pedro Azevedo

Benjamin Barfield-Marks

Ahmed Belkhodja

Severin Berchtold

1984 Born in Lucerne, Switzerland
2005-2011 Studies of Architecture at ETH Zürich
2007-2008 Internship at KEN Architects, Zürich
2009 rollimarchini Architects, Bern
2011-2012 Independent Practice
since 2012 Harry Gugger Studio, Basel

Chris Blackbee

1982 Born in Perth, Australia
2000-2004 Bachelor of Architecture with Honours from Curtin University, Perth
2003-2004 Internship at The Buchan Group Architects, Perth
2004-2005 The Buchan Group Architects, Perth
2005-2007 51N4E, Brussels
2008-2010 Santiago Calatrava, Zurich
2011-2012 Steinmann and Schmid, Basel
since 2012 Harry Gugger Studio

Emi Brian

Wtanya Chanvitan

Raphael Dufresne

Leon Faust

Joana Santos Ferreira

2008 Faculty of Architecture, Oporto University FAUP, Portugal
2012-1013 erasmus Tampere University of technology TUT Finland
since 2013 Harry Gugger Studio

Maxime Florean

Annette Fromm

Vitus Gerlach

Christian Germadnik

1976 Born in Rheinfelden, Deutschland
1998-2003 Studies of Architecture at HsKA, Karlsruhe, Germany
2003-2004 MSc Urban Regeneration, UCL, London
2004-2007 Urban Initiatives Ltd, London, UK
2007-2009 Arup Urban Design, London, UK
2009-2010 Independent practice
2010-2013 Würkert & Partner Architekten, Lörrach, Germany
since 2013 Harry Gugger Studio

Emanuel von Graffenried

Alasdair Graham

1978 Born in Aberdeen, Scotland
1996-2002 First-class Honours Degree in Architecture from Mackintosh School of Architecture
2002-2003 Diploma in Architecture from Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL
2003-2005 Masters in Architecture with Distinction from Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL (part-time)
1999 Reid, Jubb, Brown Partnership, UK
2000-2001 Erick van Egeraat Associated Architects, Rotterdam, NL
2003-2005 Avanti Architects, London, UK
2005-2006 Zaha Hadid Architects, London, UK
2006-2010 OMA, Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Rotterdam, New York, Shenzhen and Hong Kong
since 2010 Harry Gugger Studio, Basel, CH

Yann Gramegna

Harry Gugger

1956 Born in Grezenbach, Switzerland
1973-1977 Apprenticeship as toolmaker
1984-1989 Studies in Architecture at ETH Zurich and Colombia University, NY
1990 Collaboration with Herzog & de Meuron
1991 Partnership with Herzog & de Meuron
2004 Awarded the Meret Oppenheim Prize
2010 Founding Harry Gugger Studio

Teaching:
1994 Visiting Professor at the Hochschule für Architektur und Bauwesen, Weimar
2001 Visiting Professor at EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland
since 2005 Professorship at EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland

Henriette Gugger

1973 Born in Gera, Germany
1993-2000 Studies of Architecture at Bauhaus University Weimar and Chalmars Tekniska Högskolan, Gothemburg, Sweden
2000-2003 Assistant at Chair for Residential Design, Bauhaus University Weimar, Germany
2001-2003 AFF-architekten, Weimar/Berlin, Germany
2003-2005 Herzog & de Meuron Uk Ltd, London, UK
2005-2008 Senior assitant at lapa, laboratoire de production d`architecture, EPFL Lausanne
since 2010 Harry Gugger Studio

Monika Joos

Coryn Kempster

1974 Born in Brantford, Canada
1999-2008 Studies in Art and Architecture at University of Toronto and Massachusetts Institute of Technology
1999-2003 HSA Architects, Toronto
2005-2006 Barkow Leibinger Architekten, Berlin
2007-2008 Independent Practice
2008-2010 Herzog & de Meuron, Basel
since 2010 Harry Gugger Studio

Katja Kleinert

Filipe Magalhães

Patrick Meng

Raul Mera

1976 Born in Basel, Switzerland
1992-1996 Apprenticeship as design draughtsman, David Muspach Architekt HTL, Basel
1996-1998 Collaboration with David Muspach Architekt HTL, Basel
2002-2008 Studies of Architecture at Hochschule für Technik Zürich (part-time)
2001-2006 Annette Gigon / Mike Guyer Architekten, Zürich
2007 Buchner Bründler Architekten, Basel
2007-2010 EM2N, Mathias Müller & Daniel Niggli, Zürich
since 2010 Harry Gugger Studio

Teaching:
2010-2011 assistant professor BA of Architecture, Hochschule für Technik Zürich HSZ-T
2011-2014 assistant professor BA of Architecture, ZHAW, Zürich

Salome Nikuradze

Charles Proctor

1991 Born in London, England
2009-2013 First-class Honours in Architecture from The University of Bath
2011 GRID Architects, London, UK
2012 Rick Mather Architects, London, UK
since 2013 Harry Gugger Studio

Javier Mora Sanchez

Susanne Schanz

Korbinian Schneider

1981 Born in Munich, Germany
2000-2006 Studies of Architecture at EPF Lausanne
2006  Master of Arts in Architecture EPFL  (Prof. Patrick Berger)
2007-2008 OMA Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Rotterdam, Netherlands
2008-2009 Metrogramma, Milan, Italy
2009 GGAU, Zurich
2009-2010 Freelance Architect
since 2010 Harry Gugger Studio

Noélie Sénéclauze

Ana Luisa Soares

Frank Zierau

Michael Zink

1982 Born in Bühl, Germany
2002-2006 Studies of Architecture at HsKA, Karlsruhe, Germany
2004-2005 Internship at MV Architects, Beijing, China
2007-2009 Steinmann & Schmid Architekten, Basel
2010-2011 Schneider & Schneider Architekten, Aarau
since 2012 Harry Gugger Studio

Harry Gugger

In 2010 Harry Gugger founded Harry Gugger Studio after 20 years as a partner at Herzog & de Meuron. Most recently and amongst numerous other projects, he was responsible for the Caixa Forum in Madrid (2001–2008) and the Extension of the Tate Modern, London (2004-ongoing). In his own Studio he has been elaborating projects of all scales, from furniture and exhibitions to architecture and urbanism. A particular focus is put on urban studies in close connection to his teaching activities at the institute laba at the EPFL. Harry Gugger was named Ordinary Professor at the EPF Lausanne in 2005, where he founded the institute lapa, Laboratory for Architectural Production. In 2011 this institute for urban studies moved to Basel as laba, Laboratoire Bâle, in order to create the National Center of Excellence for Architecture and Urbanism „Cerberus“, in collaboration with the EPFZ Studio Basel. In 2010 Harry Gugger was named member of the board of trustees at the Holcim Foundation for Sustainable Construction.

HG_Portrait_GH_09

Awards

2013 Laba’s recent publication Barents Lessons awarded one of the Most Beautiful Swiss Books 2012, A competition by the Swiss Federal Office of Culture (BAK).
2010 Golden Lion of the Venice Architecture Biennale for the National Pavilion of Bahrain
2009 CaixaForum-Madrid receives the “Premio de Urbanismo y Construcción de la Ciudad” of X Bienal de Arquitectura Española; ES
2004 Harry Gugger is awarded the Prix Meret Oppenheim, Office Fédéral de la Culture, CH
2003 Laban Dance Center, London, UK wins RIBA Stirling Prize
1999 Brandenburgischer Architekturpreis 1999, Land Brandenburg/D for the Library Technical School Eberswalde, DE
1999 Rolf Schock Prize for the Visual Arts, Stockholm
1996 Construtec Prize for the Signal Box in Basel, European Prize for Industrial Architecture, Hannover, DE
1996 Max Beckmann Award, Frankfurt a. M., DE
1996 Brunel Award 1995, Washington DC for the Railway Engine Depot Auf dem Wolf in Basel, US
1995 Brunel Award 1994, Washington DC for the Signal Box in Basel, US

Press

Mark Magazine Notice Board – The Exchange

Mark Magazin #49 – April/Mai 2014

hochparterre Funde – “Schneller Basler”

hochparterre – April 2014 – Axel Simon

Boston Society of Architects Award 2013 – “These awards honor big ideas!”

Design New England – March/April 2014

“14 millions d’habitants, c’est vivable”

Le Temps – 28.3.2014 – Yelmarc Roulet

«Une Suisse à 14 millions d’habitants, c’est possible»

Tribune de Genève – 21.3.2014 – Pascal Schmuck

Eine Schweiz für 14 Millionen Menschen

hochparterre – 21.3.2014 – Palle Peterson

Eine Schweiz für 14 Millionen Menschen

Basler Zeitung – 21.3.2014 – Christoph Heim

Eine Schweiz mit 14 Millionen Einwohnern? Kein Problem!

Sonntagszeitung – 16.3.2014 – Gabi Schwegler

 “Maya-Museum aus Basel”

hochparterre – 3.2.2014 -  Axel Simon

“Stalking Heritage Far From Home”

New York Times – 17.1.2014 – E. Rothstein

Swiss Performance 2014 – “Rückzug mit Ausblick”

Archithese – Januar 2014 – Katharina Sommer

av proyectos – EPFL Pavillion

av proyectos  – 057 2013

Harry Gugger im Gespräch mit Stephanie Gräve über die Schweiz

Theater Basel – 28.11.2012 – Harry Gugger

Architekturgespräch Einsiedeln: Was ist Architektur?

Architekturgespräch Einsiedeln – 17.11.2012 – Harry Gugger

“Un artiste intransigeant et libre”

Le Temps – 24.09.2012 – Harry Gugger

Planspiele für 16 Millionen Schweizer

Basler Zeitung – 10.01.2012 – Harry Gugger

Vacancies

To complete our team we are looking for talented professionals to join the studio.
Our office provides a stimulating working environment. A variety of national and international projects in different stages allow our collaborators to participate actively at the project development and to broaden their experience.

Architect

- excellent design skills
- highly motivated, proactive approach, team player
- minimum 2 years of experience
- Excellent command of Adobe Suite and Vectorworks
- 3D Modelling skills, command of Rhino of advantage
- proficiency in German, English and/or french required
open positions:2
Internships

We are currently looking for interns to join our team.
If you are highly motivated, responsible, curious and a team player, you have a strong graphic and design talent, have a good command of Adobe Suite and Vectorworks, you can proof excellent model building skills and you have concluded a minimum of 3 years of study, we are looking forward to your application.
English language is a requirement, German language a great plus. Employment duration: 12 months

News

Competition Campus Rosental

University Building and Dentistry Teaching Clinic, Basel
Invited competition, 11. 2013 - 3. 2014

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Facade of High Density Housing in Allschwil near completion

Construction site update
June 20, 2014

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Schöpflin development in Baunetz News

June 17, 2014

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Project “Vision 2033” for Papieri development in Biberist (SO) has been made public

June 16, 2014

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The “Papieri” in Biberist is to be transformed from its current use as a papermill into a mixed neighborhood with various activities. The owner HIAG Immobilien commissioned five architecture offices, including Harry Gugger Studio, to elaborate a future vision for the area. The different projects and the result of the study have been presented to the general public on site at the end of May.

Sustainable construction in the focus of real estate investments

The Exchange is featured as part of an article on sustainable & energy efficient construction in the NZZ Special Edition "Immobilien", dated May 28th, 2014.

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2nd Prize in Selected Competition, Schöpflin Areal Lörrach

May 24th, 2014

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Harry Gugger Studio together with landscape architects Studio Vulkan have been awarded the 2nd prize in the selected competition to design a new sports hall and housing in Brombach, DE.

Limmatfeld Dietikon Update

May 2014

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Raul Mera on a study trip to Brasil

May 2014
São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Brasilia

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As part of the architecture course at ZHAW Zürich Andrea Landell, Kim Sneyders und Raul Mera organize a study trip to Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro und Brasilia investigating the Brazilian Modernism.

Museo Maya de América presented at MIT

Symposium "Public Space? Lost & Found"
April, 18-19 2014
Media Lab, MIT, Cambridge MA

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Coryn Kempster presented the Museo Maya de America at “Public Space? Lost & Found”, a symposium that investigated definitions of public space across disciplines and the tools, tactics and consequences of reclaiming public space through art and architecture.

Archive

Runway clear towards the Mediterranean – Switzerland and her audacious dreams

A discussion with architect Harry Gugger and sociologist Verena Tobler
May 9, 2014 at 18h00
Kulturhaus Helferei, Kirchgasse 13, 8001 Zurich
conference in German

Museo Maya de América wins BSA Award 2013

Honor Award 2013 by the Bosten Society of Architects in the category "Unbuilt Architecture and Design".

S AM conference “Switzerland – Spacial state of affairs”

Harry Gugger to take part in conference and panel discussion.
26th april 2014 at 9h - 18h30,
Ackermannshof - St. Johanns-Vorstadt 19-21 - Basel

Magma & Principes

Harry Gugger will take part in lecture series and will talk about Game & Structure
April 7, 2014 at 16h30
EPFL Ecublens, Lecture hall CM2

Topping-out of the housing complex at Steinbühlweg in Allschwil

March 21, 2014
The last of the 3 buildings of the housing complex has successfully topped-out.
The building schedule is on track and completion is planned for autumn 2014.

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How will 14 million people be living and working in Switzerland in 2048?

Book Launch, 18 March 18 2014, 6pm, EPFL laba lecture hall

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Swiss Lessons presents the findings of laba’s research on the Swiss territory as imagined for 2048 in texts, images, graphics and maps.

Eds: Harry Gugger, Aurélie Blanchard Authors: Götz Menzel, Gwendolyn Kerschbaumer Graphic design: Ludovic Balland.
Introduction by Harry Gugger, laba EPFL, and Thomas Kramer,Park Books Lecture “Population growth as a driver of spatial development in Switzerland”
by Daniel Müller-Jentsch, Avenir Suisse

Raul Mera und Alasdair Graham at the IED Barcelona

A lecture on typologie and construction
January 31, 2014 at 18h30

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The Exchange Breaks Ground, Vancouver, CA

January 23rd, 2014

The groundbreaking ceremony for Harry Gugger Studio’s first building to be built in North America was held this morning in Vancouver, Canada. ‘The Exchange’ tower, scheduled for completion in 2016, will be the first LEED Platinum Heritage Conversion in Canada and at 31 floors will also be Harry Gugger Studio’s first high-rise building to begin construction.

Studio Director Harry Gugger attended the ceremony along with representatives from the joint-owners – Credit Suisse Real Estate Fund International and SwissReal, Architect-of-Record – Iredale Group Architecture, Contractor – PCL, Project Managers – MKT and other members of the project design team.

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“Art + Architecture: Building Museums for the Future”

January 16, 2014, Lecture at the LA Art Show 2014

Harry Gugger will be discussing the development of museum design in his lecture “Art + Architecture: Building Museums for the Future” as part of the forthcoming Los Angeles Art Show on Thursday 16th January at 2pm in the Los Angeles Convention Center. More details about the lecture can be found here.

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“Designing spaces for a public art collection is a complex process that has to consider many, sometimes conflicting parameters. A museum is expected to become an art piece in itself, grow attendance, and eventually become a destination for tourism. But it also has to stand the tests of time, house a collection in perpetuity, reflect and respect the community and the collection it serves in addition to incorporating room for growth. Learn how some very different institutions are tackling these challenges and are building museums for the future”.

3rd Prize Commissioned Study, Fleischbachstrasse, Reinach, BL

December 4, 2013

WEB_NEWS_131205_038The jury praised the contribution of Harry Gugger Studio and Ganz Landscape Architects for our urban study of a residential development on Fleischbachstrasse in Reinach, Basel-Land.

Construction Site Update, Steinbühlweg, Allschwil, BL

November 27, 2013

WEB_NEWS_131127_005_RohbauConstruction continues on the residential development in Allschwil. The structure is fully in place and the windows are now installed.

Panel Discussion “The open Competition”

November 21, 2013, Städtebau-Stammtisch, Hochparterre, Zürich

WEB_NEWS_131116_Hochparterre_RaulMichael Hauser, City Architect for Winterthur, Martin Hitz, Head of Construction & Real Estate in Eastern Switzerland for Migros, Raul Mera, Architect and Partner in Harry Gugger Studio and Ruedi Vogt, President of the SIA Competition Commissioning speak with Hochparterre Competitions Editor Ivo Boesch about the problems and opportunities presented by open competitions.
Link

Limmatfeld Dietikon

November 12, 2013, Laying of the Foundation Stone

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HGS visits Gallery Xavier Hufkens

June 20, 2013

HGS makes an office trip to Brussels and visits the newly finished project of the “Second Gallery Space Xavier Hufkens” and it’s current exhibition “Robert Mapplethorpe, Au Début (works from 1970 to 1979).”
more
link
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The Most Beautiful German Books 2013

June 2013

laba’s recent publication ‘Barents Lessons’ was one of 25 winners of the ‘Most Beautiful German Books 2013’. The Book Art Foundation (Stiftung Buchkunst) honors the finest and most innovative books in 2013, exemplary in design, design and workmanship.
more
link

Laban +10 Celebration

April 25th, 2013

It is 10 years since the inauguration of the Laban Dance Centre, a project developed and realized by Harry Gugger as a partner of Herzog de Meuron. Its constructors and users celebrated the building together at an event on the 25th of April.

Rob Leslie-Carter
“…it was just fabulous to see so many people who had spent so much time working on the project ten years on – mostly having moved on a couple of chapters professionally, but still enjoying the nostalgia of being part of a great team and a truly great project for an extraordinary organisation.”
link

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Opening Gallery Xavier Hufkens

April 16, 2013

The inaugural show ‘The end of the beans’ by Harold Ancart has opened Xavier Hufkens second gallery space in Brussels. The exhibition runs until May 25th, 2013.
more
link

Completion Gallery Xavier Hufkens

April 2013

Harry Gugger Studio is proud to announce the completion of a new exhibition space for Gallery Xavier Hufkens in Brussels. The first exhibition by Harold Ancart is titled ‘The end of the beans’ and will open on the 16th April.
more
link

3rd prize Competition Hotel and Park ‘Sidebütel’

April 12, 2013

Harry Gugger Studio has won 3rd prize with the project ‘Sidebütel’ in the open competition for a new hotel and park in Heiden, Appenzell, CH.

The Most Beautiful Swiss Books 2012

March 2013

laba’s recent publication ‘Barents Lessons’ was one of eighteen winners of the ‘Most Beautiful Swiss Books 2012’.
link
more

Work

Cultural

Collection Building Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen

Art Storage and Exhibition Facility, Rotterdam, NL
Invited Competition, 08.2013 - 11.2013
  • The new Collection Building designed by Harry Gugger Studio & BARCODE Architects responds unequivocally to the layering of it’s location and is characterized by a creative, contemporary transformation of the Dutch archetype ‘PakHuis’ (warehouse). It refers both to the existing typical Dutch orchard of OMA & Yves Brunier and to the functional typology of the Rotterdam port depots. The building is set back from the neighbouring institutions on all sides and in this way it not only establishes itself as integral part of the park but also differentiates itself from competing with its direct surroundings.

    In its architectural expression the design unashamedly embraces its primary function as a depository of cultural value. It’s simple, straightforward and economical form directly engages with the character of a classic warehouse. This honest engagement with its original typology is extended to its materialisation that references the classic brick buildings in its immediate vicinity. With these aspects the design presents itself as the new Collection Building for the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen and the City of Rotterdam, which through its silhouette will become a recognizable landmark, connecting the Museum with its immediate surroundings and the rest of the city.

Museo Maya de América

Museum Building, Guatemala City, GT
Direct Comission, 05.2012 - ongoing
  • The new Museo Maya de América is among the most ambitious cultural projects under development in Central America. It is planned to house one of the world’s most significant collections of objects, artefacts, artworks, textiles and knowledge relating to the history and culture of the Mayan Civilisation.

    Located on the northern edge of L’Aurora Park, the new museum building will form the culmination of a cultural axis that includes the Guatemalan Museum of Contemporary Art and the Children’s Museum. This dense cluster of cultural institutions, in tandem with the large open spaces of the adjacent park will become a focal point for tourists and residents alike.

    The design of the new museum draws its inspiration from the language of traditional Mayan temple architecture, without directly replicating it. The building has two principle constituent elements, a fragmented plinth and a large, monolithic box above. It presents a large, abstract form to the surrounding city. With careful planning, the decision to avoid building a road to the south so that the site can be directly integrated with the park greatly compliments our initial desire to set the mass of the museum amongst a dense grove of trees.

    This close interaction with the surrounding context has directly informed the architecture of the ground levels which are organised in as open a manner as possible to link the museum’s entrance, temporary gallery spaces, café’s and sculpture garden within a sculptural landscape of smaller elements that support the galleries contained within the larger form of the box above.

    The museum takes advantage of Guatemala’s temperate climate to provide natural ventilation to the majority of its spaces. Its gallery floors are structured as an alternating pattern of ‘rooms’ and ‘plazas’ which combine to form a rich range of different exhibition spaces over the buildings several levels.

    The heart of the building is the “Cenote” which extends the sculptural language of the plinth down in to the parking and up through the museum box to form the main stair through the building. The Cenote is a large opening that is open to the sky at the centre of the museum. It is formed by a compression of the room elements found in the surrounding floorplans and forms an orientation point within the museum. This open void extends down in to the parking levels below ground, providing an interesting route up into the museum and a special place to display underworld-related artefacts. The landscaped roof of the museum is once again given back to the public with a series of different areas including a restaurant and terrace, roof gardens and viewing decks all accessible from the Cenote. The large surface of the roof will also be used to collect rainwater in a manner recalling traditional Maya practices by drawing water through a series of channels into the Cenote, enhancing the museums commitment to the environment through water recycling.

    The Museo Maya de América is developed in collaboration with over,under.

Zürich Cantonal Archive

Archive Building Extension, Zürich, CH
Open Competition, 05.2013-08.2013
  • Context
    The existing Zurich Staatsarchiv buildings sit as an outlier to the dense concrete cluster of the University of Zürich campus. This bulky set of staggered concrete volumes steps up the leafy western slope of the Zürichberg to the north of the city centre houses one of three campus centres of the university.

    The current Staatsarchiv is composed of two contrasting but connected structures built twenty-five years apart. They sit together within the broad green border between the terraced campus complex and the sunken highway cutting that separates the university proper from the broad green expanse of Irchel Park to the west. This pair of low-lying buildings are orientated roughly north-south within the alignment of the overall campus gird and extend to the south from the broad pedestrian spine that links the university buildings to the park and city beyond.

    The two existing structures closely mirror one another in their scale and volume but differ greatly in their external appearance. The rhythmic articulated external colonnade of Building 1 is contrasted in the distinct solid mass and simple apertures of the Building 2. This pure volume clearly demarcates the main public entrance to the complex.

    Concept
    Rather than completely reconfiguring the organisational strategy of the complex, we propose to continue the internal logic established with the completion of Building 2 through into the new building both above and below ground. The strength and clarity of the existing building’s structure, volume and program organization provided us with the internal DNA of the new project itself. By replicating and reinforcing the program bands of this systemic organisational and spatial arrangement within the new building the clarity of the existing internal spaces and their efficient, optimal operation are retained with a minimal interference to the existing building envelope. The main public space linking the first two buildings together on the entrance level is extended through the length of the new building to facilitate access to its public functions that are distributed to either side. A double-height volume is created above this enlarged space to provide an additional generosity to the public area as well as light, air and views to the office spaces on the level above.

    The new building’s exterior is defined by a pure and uninterrupted continuation of Building 2’s external envelope. This perfect volumetric extrusion seamlessly extends its precise form in a highly reflective mirror of the existing building. Whilst this external volume and its internal configuration is a replication, the materialization of this exterior envelope has been completely reconsidered to due the variation in its functional requirements and in anticipation of its future extension to the south. The high-performance glazed façade provides a seamless, monolithic and sustainable envelope for the new extension. Its smooth continuation of the scale, volume and dimensions of Building 2 speaks both of the expansion of its internal spatial structure and its function as an auxiliary addition to the complex.

Bird College

Further Education College Campus, London, UK
Selected Competition, 12.2012-02.2013
  • Bird College is an acknowledged centre of excellence for dance and theatre performance. The College intends to consolidate all their activities in one single campus in Sidcup, London.

    Our proposed strategy aims to accommodate the College’s ambitious ‘wish-list’ of program area into a series of simple, standardised ‘Barns’. Their careful distribution begins with an extension of the retained school building and grows along the perimeter of the site, resulting in an overall composition that carefully mitigates the scale and impact of the new program on the surroundings.

    The logic of these individual ‘Barns’ is highly systemised, prefabricated, efficient, modular and cost effective. Existing agricultural and industrial techniques can be mobilised in the production of the simple steel framework and prefabricated infill. The simple form, identity and method of construction is evocative of a vernacular architecture entirely apt for both the location and landscape of the site and recalls the traditional use of barns as public spaces for communal events and dances.

    A series of smaller, interconnected and informal spaces link the regular volumes of the ‘Barns’, forming casual communal areas for students and staff to meet, relax or warm up. It is the simple timber construction of these interstitial spaces that can enable the straightforward phasing of the College’s growth by providing a soft interface between each stage of its construction.

    Due to its high degree of flexibility, the additive nature of the proposed phasing strategy allows the College to optimise each stage as required by the fund-raising. Our approach affords the acceleration and simplification of the construction process on site, optimising costs and minimising disruption to the life of the College.

    In collaboration with Friend and Company Architects

Pavillon Place Cosandey EPFL

EPFL Lausanne, CH
Competition 04.2012 - 05.2012

Gallery Xavier Hufkens

Exhibition Space, Brussels, BE
Direct Commission, 03.2012-04.2013
  • The second gallery space of Gallery Xavier Hufkens was opened in April 2013.

    Located in the near vicinity of the existing Gallery spaces the new Gallery occupies a pair of disparate spaces that previously housed a pizzeria and a boxing club within the larger “Galerie Rivoli Arcades” building complex.

    Positioned on the corner of rue Saint-Georges and rue Praetere the new gallery sits within the plinth of this mixed-use building behind the extravagant arches of its prefabricated concrete arcade.

    Although directly above one another, the two spaces had different shapes in plan and were not connected. Our initial investigations soon revealed that the internal structure of the building was conceived without a clear pattern or order.

    Due to this disparate structure we looked to create a calmer space for the contemplation of art that is contained within but detached from its parent volumes. By creating a space-within-a-space the new gallery creates its own scale and atmosphere isolated from the complexity of the existing structure.

    This new space provides sufficient hanging space for art within the glazed spaces of the plinth. The only interaction between the new and existing structures occurs where the geometry of the new space meets the skin of the existing building. These openings wash the walls of the gallery in natural light, accommodate its entrance and expose its interior to the overlapping layers of the existing building’s structure and facade. The two originally isolated spaces are connected by a double-height gallery space that unifies the new volume and provides space for larger scale art installations.

    The restrained material palette of the gallery spaces provides a neutral background for the display of art. Only the wooden floors and the lining of the staircase walls and ceiling bestow the space with a tempered roughness that mirrors the exposed structure of the existing façade and the raw, painted brickwork of the outer face of the space within.

    The project was realised in collaboration with the local partner Slegten & Toegemann.

    Photo-credit: Allard Bovenberg, Amsterdam
    Courtesy: the Artist and Xavier Hufkens, Brussels

Zoo Restaurant

Restaurant and Conversion, Basel, CH
Invited Competition, 07-2011-10.2011

Musée Cantonal des Beaux Arts (MCBA)

Museum Building, Lausanne, CH
Selected Competition, 11.2010-03.2011
  • The historic cultivation of Lausanne’s landscape has produced a number of surprising plateaus through artificial interventions in the steep natural topography. The terrace on which the Halle aux Locomotives sits is one of these special places, however, as a service depot it has always been closed to the public. The project for the new MCBA on this site is a catalyst for opening this extraordinary topographic situation to the city, a set of Terrasses Culturelles.

    To maximize the site’s potential for becoming a significant new public space, we propose to open it up entirely. This is accomplished by planting a forest on the East side, the Terrasse Boisée; opening up the historic Halle aux Locomotives in the centre as a covered exterior public space; and by covering the new museum building to the West with a generous roof garden.

    A visit begins in the Terrasse Boisée, a forest thick with vegetation typical of the valleys around Lausanne. Inserted in the surrounding dense urban fabric, it acts as a refuge, in particular from the heavily trafficked Place de la Gare to the East and the busy rail lines to the South. In contrast to this flux, the Terrasse Boisée, together with the rest of the museum project, offers a quiet environment, a space of contemplation.

    Through the screen of trees one perceives the grand arches and large openings of the Halle aux Locomotives. A ramp leads the visitor up to the central nave of the Hall where they join those arriving from Montbenon to the North. From here a large spiral stair leads the visitor to the foyer housed in the old arcades behind the Hall where the ticketing, information and bookshop are located.

    From the arcades one steps into the Halle aux Locomotives; the rough, as-found space of the large Hall contains all the other public functions of the museum; a café, education spaces, an auditorium and a library. These different functions are differentiated through minimal interventions; level changes and discrete volumes set within the large existing space of the Hall. In the future, when the MUDAC and Musée de l’Elysée are added to the site, the Hall remains at the centre, allowing all three museums to share these public functions.

    From the Hall one may enter the museum proper. Entrances lead to either the Temporary Exhibition or the Permanent Collection, which are formed as two separate loops of galleries, each returning the visitor back to the Hall. The galleries are all at ground level and wind around internal courtyards which lend rhythm and orientation to the galleries while providing natural light and a visual connection to the Terrasses Alpines above.

    The galleries are oriented purely North-South to simplify daylighting and to connect their volumes at an urban scale with the buildings North and West of the site. Each gallery along the route differs in size and height from the previous one and has a different relationship to daylight to create a specificity for each. Prefabricated beams create large column-free galleries below while supporting the planting beds of the Terrasses Alpines above. Their structurally efficient, concave form is ideal for reflecting natural light from the clerestory windows evenly across the galleries.

    The Terrasses Alpines above the galleries end the promenade which the visitor has begun when entering the Terrasse Boisée. The tree-tops from the courtyards below blend in with the bushes on the roof to recall the vegetation of the foothills leading up to the mountains which are visible from here, conceptually collapsing the distance between the MCBA and the Savoy.

    The Terrasses Alpines culminates in the Conservation Tower. This tower houses all utilitarian spaces of the museum; deliveries, carpentry facilities, art storage and restoration workshops, together with administrative and curatorial offices. At the foot of the tower a café offers views over the railways. Beside it is an outdoor auditorium and a path leading up to a covered panoramic terrace which is carved out from the volume of the tower and offers stunning views over Lake Geneva and the Alps beyond.

“My shirt on your chair” Claudio Moser

Exhibition at Kunstmuseum Thun, CH
Direct Commission, 2009

Commercial

Campus Rosental

University Building and Dentistry Teaching Clinic, Basel
Invited competition, 11. 2013 - 3. 2014

The Exchange

High-rise Office, Vancouver, CA
Direct Commission, 10.2012-2017
  • Surrounded by water and framed by mountains, the unique urban cityscape of Vancouver’s downtown is defined by its spectacular natural setting. ‘The Exchange’ is located in the heart of this downtown area. As one of the selected few new high-density office developments in the city’s central business district this new tower will bring valuable diversity, revenue and jobs to the neighbourhood and to the city as a whole.

    The design rationale for the new tower is entirely derived from its surrounding context and environment; in particular the existing Old Stock Exchange building, which is to be preserved and rehabilitated on the site. The refined vertical pilasters of this handsome and elegant building accentuate its height whilst grounding the building within the streetscape of the city. The new tower does not attempt to dominate or compete with the strengths of this prominent original building but rather to successfully work together with it in order to create an overall composition that looks at once to Vancouver’s future without obscuring its past.

    The stratification and stepping of the tower’s form, coupled with the chamfering of its corners also reduces its overall bulk and the impact on its neighbours. By both breaking up the mass of the tower over its entire height and by recessing its bulk from the perimeter of the site above the Old Stock Exchange, the new building allows the existing structure to fully define the streetscape, retaining and confirming its proud position within the city.

    Restricted from creating a strong intervention on the city’s skyline, ‘The Exchange’ instead looks to create a distinctive icon within the space of the city itself. Viewed from the street, its cantilevered form coupled with the elegant pinstripe of its façade mullions creates a unique identity for the tower at the heart of Vancouver’s downtown.

    The Exchange is a collaboration with Vancouver based practice Iredale Group Architecture.

Hotel and Park Heiden

"Sidebütel", 3rd Prize, Heiden, CH
Open Competition, 10.2012 - 12.2012
  • The picturesque 19th-century spa town of Heiden lies within the rolling hills of Appenzell overlooking the southern shore of Lake Constance in northeast Switzerland. In order to attract more visitors to the town, a new 3-star hotel with expanded conference facilities is planned alongside the redevelopment of the town’s park the “Kurpark” and “Seeallee” promenade.

    Our proposal aims to embed itself into Heiden’s sensitive historical context, its park and surrounding urban morphology. By minimising the footprint of the hotel into a single volume a balance is created between the expanse of the park and the compact vertical mass of the hotel building within the town.

    The architecture of this volume mediates between historic local construction methods and materials and the demands of the contemporary hotel program found in the design brief. Both the fixed and mobile elements of its façades allude to the scale, articulation and character of the regions traditional farmhouses.
    The minimal structural elements of the hotel enable the creation of an extremely flexible plan supported by an efficient and economic infrastructure. This system affords the creation of both the more open lower public levels along with the more compartmentalised hotel rooms above. The ground floor provides an open-plan arrangement housing the hotel’s reception area, lounge, public bar, breakfast room and adjacent terrace with a strong relationship to the landscape of the park. The multi-functional congress facilities and office spaces of the hotel are located on the first floor.

    Above these levels five floors of hotel rooms are arranged around a naturally lit central corridor. The freedom afforded by the minimal structural system enables a varied composition of hotel rooms within the interior and provides each room with an abundance of daylight and the best possible views of the lake and landscape beyond.

University Hospital Regeneration

Hospital, Basel, CH Selected Competition, 05.2012-08.2012

Department Store Conversion

Retail Development, Zürich, CH
Direct Commission, 05.2011-10.2011

Office Building, Pro Specie Rara

Office Building, Münchenstein, CH
Direct Commission, 11.2010-02.2011

Private Office

Private office and extension of existing residence, Binningen BL
Direct commission, 4. 2010 - 4.2012, completed 4. 2012

Residential

Residential Development Maiengasse

Open Competition, December 2013

Wohnhochhaus Steinach, SG

Selected Parallel 12. 2012 - 03.2013

Schöpflin-Areal

Sportshall, Community Centre and Housing, Brombach, Germany
Selected Competition, 2 - 4 2014

Housing Juraweg

Private Residences, Dornach, CH
Direct Commission, 02.2012-03.2012, Concept Design

Housing Gellertstrasse

Private Residences, Basel, CH
Selected Competition, 04.2011-08.2011

Transitlager

Mixed-use development, Münchenstein, CH
Selected Competition, 05.2011-07.2011
  • The Transitlager is a proposal for a competition to renovate Basel’s former customs warehouse into a mixed-use development of shops, restaurants, offices, ateliers and housing.

    The ends of the original building were shaped according to the needs of transportation logistics. This unexpected contextual reference in the design of a mundane warehouse calls to mind a combination of mass production and customization. This interplay forms the basis of our concept for the project. Although assembled from prefabricated elements, the building is designed to be versatile, allowing individuals to customize their space to create a communal atmosphere while simultaneously accommodating individual needs and privacy.

    The existing building is stripped to expose its raw structure and used as a set of shelves to hold the prefabricated lightweight steel modules of the new addition. The new slimmer volume frees up a generous space on the existing slabs which accommodates a system of streets and front yards, not just on the ground floor but on all floors. The private yards created along these streets provide clearly delineated spaces that individual tenants can occupy and adapt to their own desires. This establishes a controlled transition from the communal streets to the private interiors while providing a unique amenity to every occupant of this seven storey building.

    Care is taken to retain a clear distinction between the existing building elements and the new volume. This is especially evident at the corners where the new volume cantilevers past the old slabs to further express this dialogue between old and new.

Petalida, Private Residence

Antiparos, Greece
2010-2012

Katoikia, Private Residence

Antiparos, Greece
2010-2011

High Density Housing

Housing Development, Allschwil, CH
Direct Commission, 2010-2014
  • Located within the verdant Basel Suburb of Allschwil, the site for this new high-density housing development on Steinbühlweg sits between a mix of apartment blocks, single-family houses, commercial and industrial buildings.

    How do find an appropriate scale for such density within this context?

    By careful study of the geometry of the site and the surrounding urban morphology we created a cluster of three low-rise, high-density structures that respond to both these contextual conditions and the number and scale of housing units required by the client. These three compact volumes maximise the potential green area on the site and minimise the impact of the development within the neighbourhood.

    A single common address on Steinbühlweg provides access to all three buildings via a landscaped semi-sunken pathway. Each of these structures is orientated individually in relation to the edges of the site, allowing all three to actively participate in the streetscape. This careful displacement creates a welcoming entrance area between the buildings and bestows the development with its own identity, anchoring it within the district.

    The recessed entrance path affords all ground level apartments privacy and enables a continuous green space to surround the buildings. On their interior, two apartments per floor each have their living rooms and loggias orientated to the south and southwest. Efficient internal planning enables generous living spaces and spacious bedrooms that afford a high quality of living. Further flexibility is provided between the apartment sizes within the buildings with the ability to switch the rooms on the north and east sides to allow the development to respond to changes in market conditions without compromising the quality of living in the individual apartments.

Private Residence

Basel, CH
Direct Commission, 1995 - 1996
  • The unique aspects of the property demanded an extensive study of the typology of multi-family dwellings. The conventionally used principles of sequencing and layering — as applied in row houses or apartment blocks — did not adequately respond to the questions posed by the location.

    The terrain slopes gently in a westerly direction, opening onto the access road on that side. The other boundaries of the plot are overgrown by vegetation from the adjacent properties. The empty parcel of land forms a gap in the structure of the surrounding suburban environment. The unusual dynamic into the depth of the property is accentuated by a row of fruit trees and the intrinsic proportions of the property itself.

    The initial decision was made to respect the semi-wild character of the almost abandoned property and to set the house as a ‘solitaire’ within the landscape. The free space surrounding the house has not been transformed into typical suburban gardens, but has been interpreted as a landscape.

    The homogeneously enveloped volume of the living spaces lies displaced on the basement level of fairfaced concrete which, compensating for the sloping terrain, reaches into the hillside. The crosswise positioning of the two apartments can not be read from the outside, thus the building gives the impression of being a one-family residence.

    The complex, interlocking organization of the two identically-sized apartments makes it possible for the inhabitants of both units to enjoy the advantages of the various orientations within the property, as well as benefit from the direct interplay of the ground floor spaces with the outside environment.

Urbanism

A Strategy for Aathal

Urban Study, Aathal ZH
Parallel Study on invitation, 8. 2013 - 2. 2014

Papieri Biberist

Urban Study, Biberist SO
Study on Invitiation, 8. 2013 - 1. 2014

Masterplan “Eisweiher”, Oberwil, CH

Selected Parallel Planning Study, 2013
  • The “Eisweiher”, or Ice Pond, is located between the communities Oberwil and Therwil to the south of Basel. Its triangular shape is defined by the confluence of the Birsig and Marbach rivers. The surrounding communities intend to activate this land reserve in the near future and initiated a parallel study to investigate its potential.

    Open space defines our urban design: the robust proposal defines several distinct zones or ‘islands’, which can be individually developed within an overall redevelopment strategy. The existing identifiable elements of the site, such as its field structure and water systems, are maintained and strengthened within our concept. A new circular road connects the existing streets and paths with the new development and park, linking them to the existing towns, clarifying the circulation of traffic and improving the potential of neighbouring sites.

    A primary component of the scheme is the proposed creation of a public park in the triangular piece of land between the two rivers. A long linear pond is created to define its southern edge thus forming an island. In its scale, shape and location the park will create a new publicly accessible space for both the planned developments to the south and the existing communities of Oberwil and Therwil. A youth centre positioned on the northern tip of this island will provide additional facilities for these communities.

    To the south of the park the “Eisweiher” consists of four long zones each containing a six-storey residential building that fan out towards the park. The larger dimension of those plots alludes to the original agricultural field structure found in the area and contrasts to the small parcels of land found in the adjacent areas.

    The final component of the study created six linear parcels once again based on the former field structure of the site. The inner four of these parcels are proposed to become two-floor high row houses with private gardens. The outermost parcels to the west and east house five-storey mixed use buildings that define the edges of this new neighbourhood.

Masterplan, Fleischbachstrasse, Reinach, CH

Selected Parallel Study, 2013, 3rd Prize
  • The community of Reinach to the south of Basel intends to develop a new housing scheme for more than 300 inhabitants. The project proposes six rows of apartments that define a carefully planned series of generous public spaces within this estate. The three-storey height of the development results from the desire to maintain the scale and grain of the surrounding context and prevent creating any shading to neighbouring buildings.

    The main public spaces between the apartment buildings link to the open areas of the neighbourhood and establish a strong connection between the existing and the new housing scheme

    A series of public paths and squares break the linear buildings and create easy connections within the development. The width of the paths provides space for children to play and any other activities for the inhabitants. Between the buildings additional lawns are introduced as play fields and shaded squares create the space events and chance meetings for the inhabitants.

    The housing rows are optimally orientated in an east-west direction to maximise exposure to daylight. A clear distinction between the private and more public areas within the apartment buildings is facilitated by the location of its entrances and staircases. All apartments are arranged around a group of clearly zoned open-plan living spaces.

    The ground floor apartments are raised above the ground level so as to create a clearly private outdoor space. A careful gradation across the whole site has been devised for its outdoor spaces to clearly define the edges between its generous public, semi-public and private spaces.

    The eastern elevation of the houses facing the public access path retains an urban character, whilst their western elevation features direct connections to the garden and balconies created along this facade by an offset of the different apartment types.

    The houses are constructed from prefabricated timber elements to ensure the energy efficiency, a comfortable interior climate and the long-term sustainable properties of the development. This long-term sustainability is also one of economy with a highly efficient use of floor areas both in terms of gross to net area and useable to built areas.

Hotel and Apartments

High-rise Housing and Hotel, Berlin, DE
Selected Competition, 02.2012-04.2012

Limmatfeld Mixed-use Development

Zürich, CH
Selected Competition, 11.2010-01.2011
  • The ‘Limmatfeld’ project in Dietikon on the outskirts of Zürich can be viewed in two stages. The first, a selected competition, proposes the design of a mixed-use urban block including high-rise housing, offices, a hotel and an elderly home with additional associated sheltered housing units.

    Our design takes a holistic overview of the site and its requirements to propose a series of distinct volumes around the perimeter of the site with a raised communal park in the centre. The most prominent of these elements is a slim residential tower that is designed to maximise the optimal relationship between efficiency and architectural quality. Positioned into the corner of the plot, its compact, folded footprint minimises the shadow cast over its neighbours. This cranked volume provides each of its apartments with outstanding, expansive interiors that face in two directions and are all provided with direct sunlight at least once a day.

    Through efficient planning and careful design, the entirety of the allocated program required for the competition was accommodated well within the maximum allowable volume. This abundance of volume provided us with an opportunity to offer the developer an additional building on the site capable of housing further residential units or office space.

    As a result of this competition we were commissioned with the design and execution of over a third of the program on the site. We have subsequently designed and developed two buildings; the Elderly Home and Sheltered Housing which are both now under construction. The two buildings are united at ground level by a common entrance foyer, restaurant and support spaces. This single-storey plinth ties both buildings to one another and reinforces the urban grid of the new development. To the interior of the buildings a large elevated garden offers the residents a sheltered and secure communal outside space.

    The geometry of the buildings above is similar although distinct differences provide each with its own subtle character. The broad horizontal bands of their façades wrap the complex creating a clear identity for the two separate elements, alluding to their different functions. Great care has been taken to ensure that their design combines sufficient privacy for the individual units with an abundance of daylight as well as clear views from sitting and lying positions within the interior of the rooms. Each room and apartment is provided with generous outside living space in the form of a balcony or a sheltered loggia.

Housing, Port Austerlitz

High-rise Housing, Strasbourg, FR
Selected Competition, 02.2012-05.2012

All Projects

Campus Rosental

University Building and Dentistry Teaching Clinic, Basel
Invited competition, 11. 2013 - 3. 2014

A Strategy for Aathal

Urban Study, Aathal ZH
Parallel Study on invitation, 8. 2013 - 2. 2014

Collection Building Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen

Art Storage and Exhibition Facility, Rotterdam, NL
Invited Competition, 08.2013 - 11.2013
  • The new Collection Building designed by Harry Gugger Studio & BARCODE Architects responds unequivocally to the layering of it’s location and is characterized by a creative, contemporary transformation of the Dutch archetype ‘PakHuis’ (warehouse). It refers both to the existing typical Dutch orchard of OMA & Yves Brunier and to the functional typology of the Rotterdam port depots. The building is set back from the neighbouring institutions on all sides and in this way it not only establishes itself as integral part of the park but also differentiates itself from competing with its direct surroundings.

    In its architectural expression the design unashamedly embraces its primary function as a depository of cultural value. It’s simple, straightforward and economical form directly engages with the character of a classic warehouse. This honest engagement with its original typology is extended to its materialisation that references the classic brick buildings in its immediate vicinity. With these aspects the design presents itself as the new Collection Building for the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen and the City of Rotterdam, which through its silhouette will become a recognizable landmark, connecting the Museum with its immediate surroundings and the rest of the city.

Papieri Biberist

Urban Study, Biberist SO
Study on Invitiation, 8. 2013 - 1. 2014

Residential Development Maiengasse

Open Competition, December 2013

Masterplan “Eisweiher”, Oberwil, CH

Selected Parallel Planning Study, 2013
  • The “Eisweiher”, or Ice Pond, is located between the communities Oberwil and Therwil to the south of Basel. Its triangular shape is defined by the confluence of the Birsig and Marbach rivers. The surrounding communities intend to activate this land reserve in the near future and initiated a parallel study to investigate its potential.

    Open space defines our urban design: the robust proposal defines several distinct zones or ‘islands’, which can be individually developed within an overall redevelopment strategy. The existing identifiable elements of the site, such as its field structure and water systems, are maintained and strengthened within our concept. A new circular road connects the existing streets and paths with the new development and park, linking them to the existing towns, clarifying the circulation of traffic and improving the potential of neighbouring sites.

    A primary component of the scheme is the proposed creation of a public park in the triangular piece of land between the two rivers. A long linear pond is created to define its southern edge thus forming an island. In its scale, shape and location the park will create a new publicly accessible space for both the planned developments to the south and the existing communities of Oberwil and Therwil. A youth centre positioned on the northern tip of this island will provide additional facilities for these communities.

    To the south of the park the “Eisweiher” consists of four long zones each containing a six-storey residential building that fan out towards the park. The larger dimension of those plots alludes to the original agricultural field structure found in the area and contrasts to the small parcels of land found in the adjacent areas.

    The final component of the study created six linear parcels once again based on the former field structure of the site. The inner four of these parcels are proposed to become two-floor high row houses with private gardens. The outermost parcels to the west and east house five-storey mixed use buildings that define the edges of this new neighbourhood.

Wohnhochhaus Steinach, SG

Selected Parallel 12. 2012 - 03.2013

Masterplan, Fleischbachstrasse, Reinach, CH

Selected Parallel Study, 2013, 3rd Prize
  • The community of Reinach to the south of Basel intends to develop a new housing scheme for more than 300 inhabitants. The project proposes six rows of apartments that define a carefully planned series of generous public spaces within this estate. The three-storey height of the development results from the desire to maintain the scale and grain of the surrounding context and prevent creating any shading to neighbouring buildings.

    The main public spaces between the apartment buildings link to the open areas of the neighbourhood and establish a strong connection between the existing and the new housing scheme

    A series of public paths and squares break the linear buildings and create easy connections within the development. The width of the paths provides space for children to play and any other activities for the inhabitants. Between the buildings additional lawns are introduced as play fields and shaded squares create the space events and chance meetings for the inhabitants.

    The housing rows are optimally orientated in an east-west direction to maximise exposure to daylight. A clear distinction between the private and more public areas within the apartment buildings is facilitated by the location of its entrances and staircases. All apartments are arranged around a group of clearly zoned open-plan living spaces.

    The ground floor apartments are raised above the ground level so as to create a clearly private outdoor space. A careful gradation across the whole site has been devised for its outdoor spaces to clearly define the edges between its generous public, semi-public and private spaces.

    The eastern elevation of the houses facing the public access path retains an urban character, whilst their western elevation features direct connections to the garden and balconies created along this facade by an offset of the different apartment types.

    The houses are constructed from prefabricated timber elements to ensure the energy efficiency, a comfortable interior climate and the long-term sustainable properties of the development. This long-term sustainability is also one of economy with a highly efficient use of floor areas both in terms of gross to net area and useable to built areas.

Schöpflin-Areal

Sportshall, Community Centre and Housing, Brombach, Germany
Selected Competition, 2 - 4 2014

Museo Maya de América

Museum Building, Guatemala City, GT
Direct Comission, 05.2012 - ongoing
  • The new Museo Maya de América is among the most ambitious cultural projects under development in Central America. It is planned to house one of the world’s most significant collections of objects, artefacts, artworks, textiles and knowledge relating to the history and culture of the Mayan Civilisation.

    Located on the northern edge of L’Aurora Park, the new museum building will form the culmination of a cultural axis that includes the Guatemalan Museum of Contemporary Art and the Children’s Museum. This dense cluster of cultural institutions, in tandem with the large open spaces of the adjacent park will become a focal point for tourists and residents alike.

    The design of the new museum draws its inspiration from the language of traditional Mayan temple architecture, without directly replicating it. The building has two principle constituent elements, a fragmented plinth and a large, monolithic box above. It presents a large, abstract form to the surrounding city. With careful planning, the decision to avoid building a road to the south so that the site can be directly integrated with the park greatly compliments our initial desire to set the mass of the museum amongst a dense grove of trees.

    This close interaction with the surrounding context has directly informed the architecture of the ground levels which are organised in as open a manner as possible to link the museum’s entrance, temporary gallery spaces, café’s and sculpture garden within a sculptural landscape of smaller elements that support the galleries contained within the larger form of the box above.

    The museum takes advantage of Guatemala’s temperate climate to provide natural ventilation to the majority of its spaces. Its gallery floors are structured as an alternating pattern of ‘rooms’ and ‘plazas’ which combine to form a rich range of different exhibition spaces over the buildings several levels.

    The heart of the building is the “Cenote” which extends the sculptural language of the plinth down in to the parking and up through the museum box to form the main stair through the building. The Cenote is a large opening that is open to the sky at the centre of the museum. It is formed by a compression of the room elements found in the surrounding floorplans and forms an orientation point within the museum. This open void extends down in to the parking levels below ground, providing an interesting route up into the museum and a special place to display underworld-related artefacts. The landscaped roof of the museum is once again given back to the public with a series of different areas including a restaurant and terrace, roof gardens and viewing decks all accessible from the Cenote. The large surface of the roof will also be used to collect rainwater in a manner recalling traditional Maya practices by drawing water through a series of channels into the Cenote, enhancing the museums commitment to the environment through water recycling.

    The Museo Maya de América is developed in collaboration with over,under.

Zürich Cantonal Archive

Archive Building Extension, Zürich, CH
Open Competition, 05.2013-08.2013
  • Context
    The existing Zurich Staatsarchiv buildings sit as an outlier to the dense concrete cluster of the University of Zürich campus. This bulky set of staggered concrete volumes steps up the leafy western slope of the Zürichberg to the north of the city centre houses one of three campus centres of the university.

    The current Staatsarchiv is composed of two contrasting but connected structures built twenty-five years apart. They sit together within the broad green border between the terraced campus complex and the sunken highway cutting that separates the university proper from the broad green expanse of Irchel Park to the west. This pair of low-lying buildings are orientated roughly north-south within the alignment of the overall campus gird and extend to the south from the broad pedestrian spine that links the university buildings to the park and city beyond.

    The two existing structures closely mirror one another in their scale and volume but differ greatly in their external appearance. The rhythmic articulated external colonnade of Building 1 is contrasted in the distinct solid mass and simple apertures of the Building 2. This pure volume clearly demarcates the main public entrance to the complex.

    Concept
    Rather than completely reconfiguring the organisational strategy of the complex, we propose to continue the internal logic established with the completion of Building 2 through into the new building both above and below ground. The strength and clarity of the existing building’s structure, volume and program organization provided us with the internal DNA of the new project itself. By replicating and reinforcing the program bands of this systemic organisational and spatial arrangement within the new building the clarity of the existing internal spaces and their efficient, optimal operation are retained with a minimal interference to the existing building envelope. The main public space linking the first two buildings together on the entrance level is extended through the length of the new building to facilitate access to its public functions that are distributed to either side. A double-height volume is created above this enlarged space to provide an additional generosity to the public area as well as light, air and views to the office spaces on the level above.

    The new building’s exterior is defined by a pure and uninterrupted continuation of Building 2’s external envelope. This perfect volumetric extrusion seamlessly extends its precise form in a highly reflective mirror of the existing building. Whilst this external volume and its internal configuration is a replication, the materialization of this exterior envelope has been completely reconsidered to due the variation in its functional requirements and in anticipation of its future extension to the south. The high-performance glazed façade provides a seamless, monolithic and sustainable envelope for the new extension. Its smooth continuation of the scale, volume and dimensions of Building 2 speaks both of the expansion of its internal spatial structure and its function as an auxiliary addition to the complex.

The Exchange

High-rise Office, Vancouver, CA
Direct Commission, 10.2012-2017
  • Surrounded by water and framed by mountains, the unique urban cityscape of Vancouver’s downtown is defined by its spectacular natural setting. ‘The Exchange’ is located in the heart of this downtown area. As one of the selected few new high-density office developments in the city’s central business district this new tower will bring valuable diversity, revenue and jobs to the neighbourhood and to the city as a whole.

    The design rationale for the new tower is entirely derived from its surrounding context and environment; in particular the existing Old Stock Exchange building, which is to be preserved and rehabilitated on the site. The refined vertical pilasters of this handsome and elegant building accentuate its height whilst grounding the building within the streetscape of the city. The new tower does not attempt to dominate or compete with the strengths of this prominent original building but rather to successfully work together with it in order to create an overall composition that looks at once to Vancouver’s future without obscuring its past.

    The stratification and stepping of the tower’s form, coupled with the chamfering of its corners also reduces its overall bulk and the impact on its neighbours. By both breaking up the mass of the tower over its entire height and by recessing its bulk from the perimeter of the site above the Old Stock Exchange, the new building allows the existing structure to fully define the streetscape, retaining and confirming its proud position within the city.

    Restricted from creating a strong intervention on the city’s skyline, ‘The Exchange’ instead looks to create a distinctive icon within the space of the city itself. Viewed from the street, its cantilevered form coupled with the elegant pinstripe of its façade mullions creates a unique identity for the tower at the heart of Vancouver’s downtown.

    The Exchange is a collaboration with Vancouver based practice Iredale Group Architecture.

Bird College

Further Education College Campus, London, UK
Selected Competition, 12.2012-02.2013
  • Bird College is an acknowledged centre of excellence for dance and theatre performance. The College intends to consolidate all their activities in one single campus in Sidcup, London.

    Our proposed strategy aims to accommodate the College’s ambitious ‘wish-list’ of program area into a series of simple, standardised ‘Barns’. Their careful distribution begins with an extension of the retained school building and grows along the perimeter of the site, resulting in an overall composition that carefully mitigates the scale and impact of the new program on the surroundings.

    The logic of these individual ‘Barns’ is highly systemised, prefabricated, efficient, modular and cost effective. Existing agricultural and industrial techniques can be mobilised in the production of the simple steel framework and prefabricated infill. The simple form, identity and method of construction is evocative of a vernacular architecture entirely apt for both the location and landscape of the site and recalls the traditional use of barns as public spaces for communal events and dances.

    A series of smaller, interconnected and informal spaces link the regular volumes of the ‘Barns’, forming casual communal areas for students and staff to meet, relax or warm up. It is the simple timber construction of these interstitial spaces that can enable the straightforward phasing of the College’s growth by providing a soft interface between each stage of its construction.

    Due to its high degree of flexibility, the additive nature of the proposed phasing strategy allows the College to optimise each stage as required by the fund-raising. Our approach affords the acceleration and simplification of the construction process on site, optimising costs and minimising disruption to the life of the College.

    In collaboration with Friend and Company Architects

Hotel and Park Heiden

"Sidebütel", 3rd Prize, Heiden, CH
Open Competition, 10.2012 - 12.2012
  • The picturesque 19th-century spa town of Heiden lies within the rolling hills of Appenzell overlooking the southern shore of Lake Constance in northeast Switzerland. In order to attract more visitors to the town, a new 3-star hotel with expanded conference facilities is planned alongside the redevelopment of the town’s park the “Kurpark” and “Seeallee” promenade.

    Our proposal aims to embed itself into Heiden’s sensitive historical context, its park and surrounding urban morphology. By minimising the footprint of the hotel into a single volume a balance is created between the expanse of the park and the compact vertical mass of the hotel building within the town.

    The architecture of this volume mediates between historic local construction methods and materials and the demands of the contemporary hotel program found in the design brief. Both the fixed and mobile elements of its façades allude to the scale, articulation and character of the regions traditional farmhouses.
    The minimal structural elements of the hotel enable the creation of an extremely flexible plan supported by an efficient and economic infrastructure. This system affords the creation of both the more open lower public levels along with the more compartmentalised hotel rooms above. The ground floor provides an open-plan arrangement housing the hotel’s reception area, lounge, public bar, breakfast room and adjacent terrace with a strong relationship to the landscape of the park. The multi-functional congress facilities and office spaces of the hotel are located on the first floor.

    Above these levels five floors of hotel rooms are arranged around a naturally lit central corridor. The freedom afforded by the minimal structural system enables a varied composition of hotel rooms within the interior and provides each room with an abundance of daylight and the best possible views of the lake and landscape beyond.

Pavillon Place Cosandey EPFL

EPFL Lausanne, CH
Competition 04.2012 - 05.2012

Gallery Xavier Hufkens

Exhibition Space, Brussels, BE
Direct Commission, 03.2012-04.2013
  • The second gallery space of Gallery Xavier Hufkens was opened in April 2013.

    Located in the near vicinity of the existing Gallery spaces the new Gallery occupies a pair of disparate spaces that previously housed a pizzeria and a boxing club within the larger “Galerie Rivoli Arcades” building complex.

    Positioned on the corner of rue Saint-Georges and rue Praetere the new gallery sits within the plinth of this mixed-use building behind the extravagant arches of its prefabricated concrete arcade.

    Although directly above one another, the two spaces had different shapes in plan and were not connected. Our initial investigations soon revealed that the internal structure of the building was conceived without a clear pattern or order.

    Due to this disparate structure we looked to create a calmer space for the contemplation of art that is contained within but detached from its parent volumes. By creating a space-within-a-space the new gallery creates its own scale and atmosphere isolated from the complexity of the existing structure.

    This new space provides sufficient hanging space for art within the glazed spaces of the plinth. The only interaction between the new and existing structures occurs where the geometry of the new space meets the skin of the existing building. These openings wash the walls of the gallery in natural light, accommodate its entrance and expose its interior to the overlapping layers of the existing building’s structure and facade. The two originally isolated spaces are connected by a double-height gallery space that unifies the new volume and provides space for larger scale art installations.

    The restrained material palette of the gallery spaces provides a neutral background for the display of art. Only the wooden floors and the lining of the staircase walls and ceiling bestow the space with a tempered roughness that mirrors the exposed structure of the existing façade and the raw, painted brickwork of the outer face of the space within.

    The project was realised in collaboration with the local partner Slegten & Toegemann.

    Photo-credit: Allard Bovenberg, Amsterdam
    Courtesy: the Artist and Xavier Hufkens, Brussels

University Hospital Regeneration

Hospital, Basel, CH Selected Competition, 05.2012-08.2012

Housing Juraweg

Private Residences, Dornach, CH
Direct Commission, 02.2012-03.2012, Concept Design

Hotel and Apartments

High-rise Housing and Hotel, Berlin, DE
Selected Competition, 02.2012-04.2012

Housing Gellertstrasse

Private Residences, Basel, CH
Selected Competition, 04.2011-08.2011

Department Store Conversion

Retail Development, Zürich, CH
Direct Commission, 05.2011-10.2011

Transitlager

Mixed-use development, Münchenstein, CH
Selected Competition, 05.2011-07.2011
  • The Transitlager is a proposal for a competition to renovate Basel’s former customs warehouse into a mixed-use development of shops, restaurants, offices, ateliers and housing.

    The ends of the original building were shaped according to the needs of transportation logistics. This unexpected contextual reference in the design of a mundane warehouse calls to mind a combination of mass production and customization. This interplay forms the basis of our concept for the project. Although assembled from prefabricated elements, the building is designed to be versatile, allowing individuals to customize their space to create a communal atmosphere while simultaneously accommodating individual needs and privacy.

    The existing building is stripped to expose its raw structure and used as a set of shelves to hold the prefabricated lightweight steel modules of the new addition. The new slimmer volume frees up a generous space on the existing slabs which accommodates a system of streets and front yards, not just on the ground floor but on all floors. The private yards created along these streets provide clearly delineated spaces that individual tenants can occupy and adapt to their own desires. This establishes a controlled transition from the communal streets to the private interiors while providing a unique amenity to every occupant of this seven storey building.

    Care is taken to retain a clear distinction between the existing building elements and the new volume. This is especially evident at the corners where the new volume cantilevers past the old slabs to further express this dialogue between old and new.

Zoo Restaurant

Restaurant and Conversion, Basel, CH
Invited Competition, 07-2011-10.2011

Musée Cantonal des Beaux Arts (MCBA)

Museum Building, Lausanne, CH
Selected Competition, 11.2010-03.2011
  • The historic cultivation of Lausanne’s landscape has produced a number of surprising plateaus through artificial interventions in the steep natural topography. The terrace on which the Halle aux Locomotives sits is one of these special places, however, as a service depot it has always been closed to the public. The project for the new MCBA on this site is a catalyst for opening this extraordinary topographic situation to the city, a set of Terrasses Culturelles.

    To maximize the site’s potential for becoming a significant new public space, we propose to open it up entirely. This is accomplished by planting a forest on the East side, the Terrasse Boisée; opening up the historic Halle aux Locomotives in the centre as a covered exterior public space; and by covering the new museum building to the West with a generous roof garden.

    A visit begins in the Terrasse Boisée, a forest thick with vegetation typical of the valleys around Lausanne. Inserted in the surrounding dense urban fabric, it acts as a refuge, in particular from the heavily trafficked Place de la Gare to the East and the busy rail lines to the South. In contrast to this flux, the Terrasse Boisée, together with the rest of the museum project, offers a quiet environment, a space of contemplation.

    Through the screen of trees one perceives the grand arches and large openings of the Halle aux Locomotives. A ramp leads the visitor up to the central nave of the Hall where they join those arriving from Montbenon to the North. From here a large spiral stair leads the visitor to the foyer housed in the old arcades behind the Hall where the ticketing, information and bookshop are located.

    From the arcades one steps into the Halle aux Locomotives; the rough, as-found space of the large Hall contains all the other public functions of the museum; a café, education spaces, an auditorium and a library. These different functions are differentiated through minimal interventions; level changes and discrete volumes set within the large existing space of the Hall. In the future, when the MUDAC and Musée de l’Elysée are added to the site, the Hall remains at the centre, allowing all three museums to share these public functions.

    From the Hall one may enter the museum proper. Entrances lead to either the Temporary Exhibition or the Permanent Collection, which are formed as two separate loops of galleries, each returning the visitor back to the Hall. The galleries are all at ground level and wind around internal courtyards which lend rhythm and orientation to the galleries while providing natural light and a visual connection to the Terrasses Alpines above.

    The galleries are oriented purely North-South to simplify daylighting and to connect their volumes at an urban scale with the buildings North and West of the site. Each gallery along the route differs in size and height from the previous one and has a different relationship to daylight to create a specificity for each. Prefabricated beams create large column-free galleries below while supporting the planting beds of the Terrasses Alpines above. Their structurally efficient, concave form is ideal for reflecting natural light from the clerestory windows evenly across the galleries.

    The Terrasses Alpines above the galleries end the promenade which the visitor has begun when entering the Terrasse Boisée. The tree-tops from the courtyards below blend in with the bushes on the roof to recall the vegetation of the foothills leading up to the mountains which are visible from here, conceptually collapsing the distance between the MCBA and the Savoy.

    The Terrasses Alpines culminates in the Conservation Tower. This tower houses all utilitarian spaces of the museum; deliveries, carpentry facilities, art storage and restoration workshops, together with administrative and curatorial offices. At the foot of the tower a café offers views over the railways. Beside it is an outdoor auditorium and a path leading up to a covered panoramic terrace which is carved out from the volume of the tower and offers stunning views over Lake Geneva and the Alps beyond.

Limmatfeld Mixed-use Development

Zürich, CH
Selected Competition, 11.2010-01.2011
  • The ‘Limmatfeld’ project in Dietikon on the outskirts of Zürich can be viewed in two stages. The first, a selected competition, proposes the design of a mixed-use urban block including high-rise housing, offices, a hotel and an elderly home with additional associated sheltered housing units.

    Our design takes a holistic overview of the site and its requirements to propose a series of distinct volumes around the perimeter of the site with a raised communal park in the centre. The most prominent of these elements is a slim residential tower that is designed to maximise the optimal relationship between efficiency and architectural quality. Positioned into the corner of the plot, its compact, folded footprint minimises the shadow cast over its neighbours. This cranked volume provides each of its apartments with outstanding, expansive interiors that face in two directions and are all provided with direct sunlight at least once a day.

    Through efficient planning and careful design, the entirety of the allocated program required for the competition was accommodated well within the maximum allowable volume. This abundance of volume provided us with an opportunity to offer the developer an additional building on the site capable of housing further residential units or office space.

    As a result of this competition we were commissioned with the design and execution of over a third of the program on the site. We have subsequently designed and developed two buildings; the Elderly Home and Sheltered Housing which are both now under construction. The two buildings are united at ground level by a common entrance foyer, restaurant and support spaces. This single-storey plinth ties both buildings to one another and reinforces the urban grid of the new development. To the interior of the buildings a large elevated garden offers the residents a sheltered and secure communal outside space.

    The geometry of the buildings above is similar although distinct differences provide each with its own subtle character. The broad horizontal bands of their façades wrap the complex creating a clear identity for the two separate elements, alluding to their different functions. Great care has been taken to ensure that their design combines sufficient privacy for the individual units with an abundance of daylight as well as clear views from sitting and lying positions within the interior of the rooms. Each room and apartment is provided with generous outside living space in the form of a balcony or a sheltered loggia.

Petalida, Private Residence

Antiparos, Greece
2010-2012

Office Building, Pro Specie Rara

Office Building, Münchenstein, CH
Direct Commission, 11.2010-02.2011

Housing, Port Austerlitz

High-rise Housing, Strasbourg, FR
Selected Competition, 02.2012-05.2012

Katoikia, Private Residence

Antiparos, Greece
2010-2011

High Density Housing

Housing Development, Allschwil, CH
Direct Commission, 2010-2014
  • Located within the verdant Basel Suburb of Allschwil, the site for this new high-density housing development on Steinbühlweg sits between a mix of apartment blocks, single-family houses, commercial and industrial buildings.

    How do find an appropriate scale for such density within this context?

    By careful study of the geometry of the site and the surrounding urban morphology we created a cluster of three low-rise, high-density structures that respond to both these contextual conditions and the number and scale of housing units required by the client. These three compact volumes maximise the potential green area on the site and minimise the impact of the development within the neighbourhood.

    A single common address on Steinbühlweg provides access to all three buildings via a landscaped semi-sunken pathway. Each of these structures is orientated individually in relation to the edges of the site, allowing all three to actively participate in the streetscape. This careful displacement creates a welcoming entrance area between the buildings and bestows the development with its own identity, anchoring it within the district.

    The recessed entrance path affords all ground level apartments privacy and enables a continuous green space to surround the buildings. On their interior, two apartments per floor each have their living rooms and loggias orientated to the south and southwest. Efficient internal planning enables generous living spaces and spacious bedrooms that afford a high quality of living. Further flexibility is provided between the apartment sizes within the buildings with the ability to switch the rooms on the north and east sides to allow the development to respond to changes in market conditions without compromising the quality of living in the individual apartments.

Private Office

Private office and extension of existing residence, Binningen BL
Direct commission, 4. 2010 - 4.2012, completed 4. 2012

“My shirt on your chair” Claudio Moser

Exhibition at Kunstmuseum Thun, CH
Direct Commission, 2009

Private Residence

Basel, CH
Direct Commission, 1995 - 1996
  • The unique aspects of the property demanded an extensive study of the typology of multi-family dwellings. The conventionally used principles of sequencing and layering — as applied in row houses or apartment blocks — did not adequately respond to the questions posed by the location.

    The terrain slopes gently in a westerly direction, opening onto the access road on that side. The other boundaries of the plot are overgrown by vegetation from the adjacent properties. The empty parcel of land forms a gap in the structure of the surrounding suburban environment. The unusual dynamic into the depth of the property is accentuated by a row of fruit trees and the intrinsic proportions of the property itself.

    The initial decision was made to respect the semi-wild character of the almost abandoned property and to set the house as a ‘solitaire’ within the landscape. The free space surrounding the house has not been transformed into typical suburban gardens, but has been interpreted as a landscape.

    The homogeneously enveloped volume of the living spaces lies displaced on the basement level of fairfaced concrete which, compensating for the sloping terrain, reaches into the hillside. The crosswise positioning of the two apartments can not be read from the outside, thus the building gives the impression of being a one-family residence.

    The complex, interlocking organization of the two identically-sized apartments makes it possible for the inhabitants of both units to enjoy the advantages of the various orientations within the property, as well as benefit from the direct interplay of the ground floor spaces with the outside environment.

Contact

map2Address:

Harry Gugger Studio
Luftgässlein 4
4051 Basel
t +41 61 225 55 85
f +41 61 225 55 86

Email:

If you are planning a project and would like more information about the Studio,  please contact us at: projects (at) hgugger.ch

If you require press information about the 
Studio and our projects, please contact us at:
media (at) hgugger.ch

Please send your application, as detailed above, to:
recruit (at) hgugger.ch

For any other questions, we are happy to receive your mail at:
mail (at) hgugger.ch

Impressum

© Harry Gugger Studio Ltd. 2014
This website and the ideas incorporated herein, as an instrument of professional service, is the property of 
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Research

EPFL laboratory Basel

Since 2011 the EPFL runs an urban design laboratory in Basel. At Laba (Laboratory Basel), students and scientists work on the cities of the future. Together with Studio Basel, led by ETH Zurich, a true centre of competence in architecture and urban planning is set up in the city on the Rhine.

laba-ackermannshof-seminarspace_Covino
link

In August 2011, Prof. Gugger inaugurated a laboratory devoted to urban design research and teaching at the Ackermannshof in Basel. Laba brings together scientists and PhD and Master students from Lausanne. Simultaneously, a collaboration platform is being set up with Studio Basel, a laboratory of ETH Zurich which notably relies on the expertise of architects Jacques Herzog, Pierre de Meuron, Roger Diener and Marcel Meili.

Urban development, a worldwide problem… which also affects Switzerland

Urbanization is a most topical issue. Whereas the word calls forth the skyscrapers on the US East Coast or the megacities in Asia, Harry Gugger observes that there is no need to look that far. Switzerland – one of the world’s most densely populated countries – is a perfect open-air laboratory. “Every day a large share of our land is sacrificed to accommodate urban development. Many areas considered as countryside just twenty years ago no longer really fit this definition”.
“The time has come to ask ourselves what kind of urbanization we want”, says the architect. “The differences between town and country tend to gradually fade away. Personally, I find that extremely sad”.
Basel will provide an ideal venue to design the cities of tomorrow. Laba will welcome about thirty Master students from Lausanne two days a week, as well as three PhD students, tutored by a teaching staff of three.

Basel – a meeting point for the two Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology

This EPFL laboratory is located in the Ackermannshof, a 14th century architectural ensemble at the heart of the student quarter. In the immediate vicinity are the Basel University, the University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW) and Studio Basel, the ETH Zurich’s outpost devoted to urban and architectural research.
A collaboration platform called Cerberus has been implemented together with Studio Basel, which relies, among others, on the talent of Pritzker Prize winner Jacques Herzog. “By putting together Studio Basel and Laba, we shall have a sound critical mass of scientists and students”, the architect explains. “Moreover, Basel is without a doubt the architecture and urban design capital of Switzerland. In such a stimulating environment, we are bound to create something extraordinary”.